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      • Mobile Expense Management

        Managing mobile costs is a challenge for all organisations, especially as responsibilities and budget authority often sit in several places—IT, finance, personnel, managers and, of course, the employees themselves. This situation becomes even more complex and problematic for those organisations that span more than one country or have to use multiple suppliers within one country. Getting to grips with these costs in a way that does not undermine the value of mobile flexibility is paramount, and organisations need to gather sufficient detail to effectively manage and analyse their mobile costs. Organisations need to get a grip of mobile spending. Trends such as BYOD might be leading to a reduction in capital expenditure, but there are operational communications, software and security costs and many will be growing. Increased use of mobile to extend and improve business processes should not be inadvertently restrained, but no budgets are limitless.

        View E-Handbook
      • Protecting against modern password cracking

        Attackers are increasingly turning to human psychology and the study of password selection patterns among user groups to develop sophisticated techniques that can quickly and effectively recover passwords. Passwords are commonly protected by applying a one-way cryptographic algorithm that produces a hash of set length given any password as input. However, cryptography can only protect something to the point where the only feasible attack on the encrypted secret is to try to guess it. When it comes to passwords, guessing can be easy.

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      • Herding Geese: The Retail Supply Chain

        On September 9th, 2002 Walmart announced that it had selected software from a small company called iSoft to power its new Internet-based EDI system. This was the shot heard round the world in the EDI industry. The new Internet EDI technology, called AS2, would circumvent the VANs, enabling businesses to exchange transactions directly over the Internet. Walmart’s announcement had catastrophic impacts to the EDI VAN business that had a virtual monopoly on supply chain B2B transactions for decades. Most analysts would place the EDI VAN sector in the category of a melting ice cube. In fact, in 2002 experts predicted that EDI VANs would be dead by the year 2010, if not 2005. However, the EDI VAN business is still a $1 billion sector in the year 2012.

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      • Preparing for the Capital Requirements Directive

        The latest round of regulation from the EU to attempt to create a more stable financial system that can better withstand global economic cycles and upheaval was meant to come into force on January 1st, 2013. The Capital Requirements Directive (CRD), now in its fourth iteration, brings new reporting structures into place. A business-driven language, the eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) is a mandated part of how financial organisations across the EU will have to submit their prudential reports to the necessary bodies. Just how prepared were the financial markets across Europe for CRD IV and XBRL?

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      • Deciding where to deploy solid-state storage devices

        Solid-state storage can be deployed in a storage array alongside traditional hard disk drives, as an all-flash array, as a separate caching appliance, or in the a server using a PCIe card. Each approach has pros and cons which must be weighed based on the workload you are trying to address before deploying a solution. In this Drill Down on where to deploy solid-state storage, you will find an article explaining the pros and cons of all of these options, another piece which discusses effective use cases for solid-state storage, and a third which outlines examples of when flash is not the right tool for the job. This compilation of articles details the solid-state implementations available today and helps you figure out how to decide which is right for your organization's needs. If you are considering an investment in solid-state storage, this Drill Down is great place to start.

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      • Navigate the complex world of all-flash arrays

        Many early implementations of solid-state storage were hybrid arrays making use of hard disks as well as flash. Today, there are a number of vendors offering all-flash arrays as the price of flash continues to drop. This handbook takes a look at how all-flash arrays are being used today and what organizations should consider before deploying an all-flash array.

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Featured E-ZINES on searchSolidStateStorage.comView all >>

  • Storage magazine

    Storage magazine keeps IT and storage managers up to date on new storage technologies, and how those techs can meet emerging business requirements.

  • CIO Decisions

    Enterprise CIO Decisions Ezine offers IT and business strategies and insights on the latest technologies making waves in the modern IT organization.

ALL TECHTARGET E-ZINES

Featured E-BOOKS on searchSolidStateStorage.comView all >>

  • Overcome today's disaster recovery challenges

    The use of devices not connected to a local network is a challenge for IT staffs tasked with protecting data on those devices. Completing backups within a reasonable timeframe has become an issue for organizations. Some organizations are opting for alternatives to traditional backup to address these challenges. The cloud has been pushed as an alternative to tape for offsite storage for disaster recovery. However, there are challenges with this approach and with protecting applications running in the cloud.

  • Cloud storage challenges and choices

    Our comprehensive e-book tackles the cloud storage challenges and business decisions that surround cloud storage investments, and breaks them into three areas of concentration: architecture, availability and return on investment.

    Get the latest updates on architectural choices when using the cloud for storage, including cloud controllers and application programming interfaces. We provide a short list of technical capabilities to look for in a cloud controller and questions to ask your service provider. Learn which metrics your peers are using to determine if cloud storage projects are meeting their potential, and what sort of service levels you can expect from providers or hybrid projects. Discover how to leverage the most cutting-edge cloud technologies and how not to get taken advantage of when choosing a cloud storage strategy/service.

OTHER FEATURED E-BOOKS

Featured E-HANDBOOKS on searchSolidStateStorage.comView all >>

  • Mobile Expense Management

    Managing mobile costs is a challenge for all organisations, especially as responsibilities and budget authority often sit in several places—IT, finance, personnel, managers and, of course, the employees themselves. This situation becomes even more complex and problematic for those organisations that span more than one country or have to use multiple suppliers within one country. Getting to grips with these costs in a way that does not undermine the value of mobile flexibility is paramount, and organisations need to gather sufficient detail to effectively manage and analyse their mobile costs. Organisations need to get a grip of mobile spending. Trends such as BYOD might be leading to a reduction in capital expenditure, but there are operational communications, software and security costs and many will be growing. Increased use of mobile to extend and improve business processes should not be inadvertently restrained, but no budgets are limitless.

  • Protecting against modern password cracking

    Attackers are increasingly turning to human psychology and the study of password selection patterns among user groups to develop sophisticated techniques that can quickly and effectively recover passwords. Passwords are commonly protected by applying a one-way cryptographic algorithm that produces a hash of set length given any password as input. However, cryptography can only protect something to the point where the only feasible attack on the encrypted secret is to try to guess it. When it comes to passwords, guessing can be easy.

OTHER FEATURED E-HANDBOOKS